Salesforce data loss can happen purposefully

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Salesforce data loss can happen to anyone – and the facts prove it! Losing data is much more common than many believe and can potentially cost thousands of dollars in recovery fees and labor hours. There are many causes that range from employee mistakes to hardware failures. Fortunately, losing your Salesforce data is preventable. At the beginning of 2019, we did a post on this topic to help organizations understand the impacts of data loss. This year, we’ve compiled a bite-size guide for preventing Salesforce data loss, complete with new statistics. Ready to jump in? Here’s what you need to know to avoid data loss in Salesforce in 2020.

First step: Understanding your risk

Understanding your organization’s risk factors is the first step to take when you’re working on Salesforce data loss prevention. Ask yourself: Who has access to your data? How many vendors are you working with? Do you have documented security practices in place? In order to prevent data loss, you have to be aware of the risks and how you’re currently handling your data. Then, you can take that information and create a plan to reduce your risk.

An alarming number of companies don’t have plans in place to deal with data loss and reduce their risk. So by taking time to understand the realities of data loss and how you can deal with it you’re already a step ahead of your competitors.

Now that we’ve covered why understanding your risk is important, let’s look at some of the potential risks. In the sections that follow, we’ll dig a little deeper into the impacts of the following:

Human error
Malware
No file protection
Hackers
No recovery plan

Human error

Everyone makes mistakes. However, when it comes to data, human error can have huge and expensive consequences for companies. Data shows that 1/3 of data loss happens as a result of human error. In a time where we are processing so much data and using complex systems, these errors can happen and are difficult to recover from. You can prevent some of this by keeping your data clean and having clear rules for deletion. However, there’s only one way to ensure that you won’t feel the impact of human error. Companies must take this risk factor seriously and consider it when they develop their data loss prevention plan for 2020.

Malware

Malware presents a huge threat of data loss for consumers and businesses alike. There are new kinds of malware popping up every day and if companies don’t know how to manage it, it can cost both data and money. One study showed that the average cost of a malware attack on a company is $2.6 million. The worst part? Malware attacks can usually be prevented if companies have the right strategies in place. All of the loss that comes as a result of malware is unnecessary.

No file protection

According to the 2018 Global Data Risk Report by Varonis, 21% of all folders used by a company are open to everyone. The fact is that companies aren’t doing enough to control who has permissions to what files. This can create chaos throughout your organization and contributes to your risk of data loss.

Hackers

Hackers and cyberattacks are more common and sophisticated than ever before. This means that companies have to be diligent about protecting their data from hackers. This doesn’t mean that you only need to protect yourself from outside threats. While most organizations would like to think this wouldn’t happen to them, hacking happens internally as well. Nearly one-fifth of employees say that they’ve been involved with a security breach at their company. Some of these breaches and some are not. Still, most organizations don’t pay close attention to internal risks, leaving them vulnerable to data loss.

No recovery plan

One study shows that 34% of companies don’t prioritize disaster recovery. The problem? In the event of data loss, not having a recovery plan in place can take out businesses. In fact, those that don’t have a plan and are unable to back up their data usually don’t recover. The impact of losing data causes them to quickly close their doors.

The number of organizations that actually have a data loss prevention plan in place is alarmingly low. In fact, up to 83% of organizations don’t have a backup plan to protect themselves from data loss. If members of your team can’t confidently point to a backup plan or solution, your organization is likely not protected against the threats of data loss.

Not testing backup strategies

Even those that do have a data back up strategy aren’t testing it. While you should build a plan and use resources that you are confident will work, you can’t set and forget data backup. Doing so will leave you vulnerable if a disaster does occur inside your organization. To keep Salesforce data secure, you should conduct regular backups and ensure that your strategies are working the way you expect them to. Otherwise, you could find yourself struggling to manage the consequences of a data breach.

What happens when backup strategies fail? There are recovery services, but they come at a price. For example,
the recovery service that Salesforce offers costs $10,000. The worst part is, that’s just the beginning. Recovering the data is just one of the costs involved. Beyond that, you have to consider the fact that overall productivity will go down until this issue is resolved, and your team is also likely to lose sales in the meantime.

Want to protect your Salesforce data in 2020?

We’re here to help. Our solution, Reflection Enterprise is a next-generation Salesforce data backup and recovery solution that lets you execute on-premise or cloud backup, replication, restoration, and integration of Salesforce data all in one platform. All these features allow you to manage data better and be confident that you are in the clear if your organization ever faces data loss. Want to know more about Reflection Enterprise? You can start a free trial today or schedule a demo with our team by clicking here.

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